An Iraqi soldier stands guard at a cemetery in Baghdad
An Iraqi soldier stands guard at a cemetery in Baghdad, 2010. A major Iraqi tribe has prohibited the family of an executed Al-Qaeda member from organising a condolences ceremony and from burying him in the cemetery in his home town north of Baghdad. © Ahmad al-Rubaye - AFP/File
An Iraqi soldier stands guard at a cemetery in Baghdad
AFP
Last updated: February 9, 2012

Iraq tribe blocks memorial for hanged Qaeda member

A major Iraqi tribe has prohibited the family of an executed Al-Qaeda member from organising a condolences ceremony and from burying him in the cemetery in his home town north of Baghdad.

Iraq executed 14 people convicted of "terrorism and other crimes" on Tuesday, bringing to at least 65 the number of people executed here this year.

According to residents of Dhuluiyah, a Sunni town, the family of Walid Nayef Abboud al-Juburi received his body at 7:00 am (0400 GMT) on Wednesday, and wanted to organise a three-day mourning ceremony for the deceased.

"His family was preparing to pitch a tent to receive condolences but the leaders of the (Al-Jubur) tribe prevented them from doing so."

They also said no Al-Qaeda members could be buried in the tribe's area of the cemetery, a witness told AFP, asking not to be identified for fear of retribution.

The family buried him outside the town, according to the witness.

A leader of the Al-Jubur tribe, who also asked not to be identified, said the tribe's decision to block the ceremony was meant to "prevent deadly friction between the family of the murderer and those of the victims in the town and the region."

A security official in the town said Juburi had killed four inhabitants of Dhuluiyah, including two policemen, and kidnapped and killed Shiites in Balad, a town 20 kilometres (12 miles) to the south.

Meanwhile, photos and posts praising Abu Talha, who was the main leader of Al-Qaeda in Iraq after Abu Mussab Zarqawi was killed by US forces in 2006 and who was also executed on Tuesday, were published on Thursday on the jihadist website Honein.

Abu Talha, whose real name was Mohammed Khalaf Shakar, was arrested in 2005 by US forces "after he was denounced by members of his family," according to posts on the site.

Shakar sought refuge in Kurdistan when Saddam Hussein was still in power, and participated in the founding of the Ansar al-Islam extremist group before joining Al-Qaeda.

"After the 2003 invasion, he returned to Mosul where he became the head of the organisation in north Iraq," according to the site.

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