Hamas premier Ismail Haniya said Hamas disagreed "with this political activity and this initiative"
Hamas's prime minister in Gaza, Ismail Haniya, attends a meeting of the Palestinian legislative council in Gaza City on September 18. The Islamist Hamas ruling the Gaza Strip and its secular rival Fatah agreed on Monday not to stage demonstrations in the enclave over the Palestinians' UN demand for statehood. © Mahmud Hams - AFP/File
Hamas premier Ismail Haniya said Hamas disagreed
AFP
Last updated: October 19, 2011

Hamas PM calls for strategic dialogue on Palestine

Hamas prime minister Ismail Haniya on Monday called for an inter-Palestinian strategic dialogue to decide on a joint strategy for establishing a Palestinian state.

"We are in favour of a strategic dialogue that will lead to a joint strategy regarding Palestine and activating the reconciliation we signed," he told reporters, referring to a unity deal between Hamas and its Fatah rivals which was signed in May but has yet to be implemented.

His remarks were made just days after Palestinian president and Fatah leader Mahmud Abbas went to the United Nations to formally request that the world body grant membership to a Palestinian state.

Although Gaza's Hamas rulers did not actively oppose the move to seek UN membership, they say they were not consulted over the decision and have argued that it had "no substance" because it would not achieve concrete results in ending the Israeli occupation.

"We are not against a state but we disagree with this political activity and this initiative," Haniya said.

"The Palestinian cause is a cause of a nation and Palestinian officials should not be alone facing American and Zionist policies. We should invest in the revival of the nation to toughen our positions," he added.

The two Palestinian national movements should work together to ensure their case was put before the Arab and Islamic world, he said.

"We want to uproot the Palestinian cause from American and Zionist circles and bring it back to the Palestinian, Arab and Islamic ones."

Hamas, he said, would back the establishment of a Palestinian state "on any liberated land" -- on condition it would not have to recognise Israel.

"We say liberation first then the state because states can't be created through UN decisions or through manoeuvres and compromises, but through steadfastness and resistance."

As he was returning from New York on Saturday, Abbas told reporters he was committed to the "next step in a comprehensive dialogue" with Hamas and also wanted to strike up dialogue with them over the direction of the Palestinian endeavour.

"Some Hamas officials opposed the (UN) approach by the Palestinian leadership and had reservations, but overall, I received support among leaders," he said.

"We will discuss reconciliation with Hamas but also the prospects of the Palestinian movement."

blog comments powered by Disqus
Stay Connected
twitter icon Twitter 13,558 linkedin icon LinkedIn 463
facebook icon Facebook 87,173 google+ icon Google+ 272