International Olympic Committee (IOC) president Jacques Rogge is pictured in 2011
International Olympic Committee (IOC) president Jacques Rogge, pictured here in 2011, said on Sunday he will keep up the pressure on Saudi Arabia, who have once again refused to send a women's team to the Olympic Games. Ten days ago, the head of the Saudi Olympic Committee ruled out sending women athletes from the ultra-conservative kingdom to the London Olympics. © Fabrice Coffrini - AFP/File
International Olympic Committee (IOC) president Jacques Rogge is pictured in 2011
AFP
Last updated: April 15, 2012

IOC to keep pressure the Saudis on women's participation in the Olympics

International Olympic Committee (IOC) president Jacques Rogge said on Sunday he will keep up the pressure on Saudi Arabia, who have once again refused to send a women's team to the Olympic Games.

"We are always talking to Saudi Arabia (about sending a women's team to the London Games) and we expect a very rapid conclusion," said Rogge.

Ten days ago, the head of the Saudi Olympic Committee ruled out sending women athletes from the ultra-conservative kingdom to the London Olympics.

Prince Nawaf bin Faisal said, however, that Saudi women taking part independently are free to do so and the kingdom's Olympic authority would "only help in ensuring that their participation does not violate the Islamic sharia law".

Equestrian jumping contestant Dalma Malhas, 18, is likely to be Saudi Arabia's only female athlete at this summer's Olympics.

Saudi Arabia, Qatar and Brunei are the only three countries never to have sent women athletes to the Olympics.

But Qatar, which is hoping to stage the 2020 Games, has said it will send three to London -- shooter Bahia Al-Hamad, swimmer Nada Mohammed Wafa Arakji and Noor Al-Malki, a 100m and 200m sprinter.

blog comments powered by Disqus
Stay Connected
twitter icon Twitter 13,558 linkedin icon LinkedIn 463
facebook icon Facebook 87,173 google+ icon Google+ 272