Morsi hashtag
Dr Tarek Suwaidan, General Manager of El Ressala channel, wrote, “I do not really understand why some Islamists consider the political opposition a resistance to Islam itself, we’ll let them remember that they are human beings and that Islamists are not Islam itself.” © Your Middle East
Morsi hashtag
Alaa Ibrahim
Last updated: December 17, 2012

Egyptian tweeters type #Morsi

Internet activist:Dear president, don’t crush your legitimacy with your hands.”
Dr. Tarek Al-Suwaidan: “
Islamists are not Islam itself.”

The recent demonstrations in Egypt have highlighted the importance of social media in channeling the views of the Egyptian people, who previously used online media forums to defend their opinions and eliminate the former regime.

In social media, the split between supporters and opponents of President Morsi’s constitutional declaration is evident. In the next few lines we review opinions expressed on Twitter by Egyptian movie stars, scholars, and other public figures.

Dr. Tarek Al-Suwaidan, General Manager of Al-Resalah Satellite TV, wrote, “I do not really understand why some Islamists consider the political opposition a resistance to Islam itself, we’ll let them remember that they are human beings and that Islamists are not Islam itself.”

Khaled Abol Naga, a movie star, stated on his Twitter account “The Brotherhood’s weakness is drawn back at protesting by the orders of their rulers, while nations rise up without a leader and no leader can ever stop them.”

Dr Alaa Sadeq, a TV presenter, noted, “those who read the nation’s history realize that there is no reason to worry about Egypt, and for those who said that Morsi is another Pharaoh, I tell them that if he is so why did he leave broadcasters and journalists criticizing him all that time?”

Dr. Mohamed ElBaradei, the former Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency, uses his Twitter account to interact with his supporters “The Egyptian revolution has been aborted until further notice but we will not forget the martyrs and the reasons they were killed, and we’ll not relinquish our peaceful revolution".

Nabil El Halafawy, a prominent Egyptian actor, writes on his Twitter account, “after the revolution and breaking the barrier of people’s fear, I imagine that it is impossible to repeat the errors whoever is the next president".

#Morsi is the hashtag people use to voice opinions about the president on Twitter. The following is a selection of some of those that caught our attention.

“I guess the first wave of Egyptian revolution has come to an end and what is currently happening is a second wave. As the Muslim Brotherhood party is governing things then it is their turn to choose either to become revolutionists or to go on pretending they represent the ‘Couch Party’. Revolution keepers are still the same and are free whatever happens.”

Another tweeter said, “Al Nahda project is a total nonsense and the 100 days plan is nothing but ‘The Thousand Nights and A Night’ legendary story. After all, they want to form the new constitution the way they see it”.

Others suggested a solution. “The president and his party should look for a safe exit to get rid of the constitutional declaration. Violence brings back violence and our demands are legitimate till this very moment”.

“The Egyptian nation will not accept a new dictator and we have all the right in getting out a constitution that guarantees freedom, equality, justice and democracy. Dear president, you are crushing your legitimacy with your hands, unless you withdraw the totally unjust constitutional announcement,” tweeted another.

What do you think? Tell us in the comment field below or on our Facebook page.

Alaa Ibrahim is a Cairo-based journalist and regular contributor to Your Middle East. She also writes for Al Alam al Youm.

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