A handout picture released by the Press office of the Middle East Broadcasting Center on December 14, 2014, shows 21-year-old Syrian contest Hazem Sherif (2nd-R) awaiting the declaration of the winner in this year's "Arab Idol" singing contest
A handout picture released by the Press office of the Middle East Broadcasting Center on December 14, 2014, shows 21-year-old Syrian contest Hazem Sherif (2nd-R) awaiting the declaration of the winner in this year's "Arab Idol" singing contest © - MBC Press Office/AFP
A handout picture released by the Press office of the Middle East Broadcasting Center on December 14, 2014, shows 21-year-old Syrian contest Hazem Sherif (2nd-R) awaiting the declaration of the winner in this year's
<
>
Mohamad Ali Harissi
Last updated: December 15, 2014

Syrian wins the hugely popular Arab Idol – but stays out of politics

Banner Icon A Syrian from war-torn Aleppo was declared the winner of this year's "Arab Idol" singing contest at the grand finale of the gruelling four-month television competition in Beirut this weekend.

The audience at Saturday's finale broke into applause and cheers, chanting "Syria! Syria!" and "Hazem!" when the jury of the pan-Arab song contest announced Hazem Sherif as the winner.

The 21-year-old kept clear of politics, avoiding taking sides in the nearly four-year conflict that has divided his country and killed more than 200,000 people.

"I would like to thank everyone, every Syrian citizen, who voted for me... I would like to thank the Syrian people," Sherif, who lives in Lebanon, said after his win.

Handsome in a dark suit and black tie, his hair done up in a trendy quiff and sporting a close-shaved beard, Sherif told reporters: "I am 21; I don't want to link my artistic career to politics."

The competition, organised by the Saudi MBC network, is one of the most watched television shows across the Middle East, viewed by some 100 million people.

Sherif beat Palestinian Haitham Khalailah and Saudi Majid al-Madani as he inched his way to the top performing a variety of songs, including the traditional qudud of his hometown Aleppo.

The form of singing is often based on popular poetry and among the lyrics sung by Sharif was "Aleppo is a fountain of pain that flows in my country".

Last year's title went to Mohammed Assaf, a young Palestinian from the Israeli-blockaded Gaza Strip who went on to become an ambassador for the UN agency for Palestinian refugees UNRWA.

Sherif's victory was feted in the government-controlled side of Aleppo, his hometown in northern Syria and the country's former economic hub, with men firing shots in the air to celebrate and women ululating.

"This event proves that we are still alive, we are still here, even if the rest of the world has forgotten us," 24-year-old resident Ahmed Abu Zeid said.

Clients at the Al-Mashraka cafe in central Damascus waved Syrian flags as they watched the live broadcast from Beirut.

"This gives optimism to the people of Aleppo, and to all Syrians," said a young woman who gave only her first name, Yara.

On the rebel-controlled side of Aleppo, residents said they had never heard of Sherif and had no reason to celebrate.

"Electricity was down so we could not watch TV. And besides, most people haven't ever heard of this show," said a man calling himself Zein.

Sherif's victory also fuelled controversy on Twitter, with some users accusing him of backing the government of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad and others wondering if he is a "rebel".

Syrian state news agency SANA congratulated Hazem as "the son of Aleppo who won thanks to a very special voice".

The winner of the contest, modelled on the popular "Pop Idol" franchise that started in Britain, walks away with a cash prize and a record contract.

blog comments powered by Disqus
Stay Connected
twitter icon Twitter 13,558 linkedin icon LinkedIn 463
facebook icon Facebook 87,173 google+ icon Google+ 272