Khashash al Hamam, overview of central Damascus
© John Wreford
Khashash al Hamam, overview of central Damascus
Last updated: September 5, 2015

PHOTOS: My memories of the Kashash al Hamam of Syria

Banner Icon Photo Essay Photojournalist John Wreford had lived in Syria for many years when the war started. In this personal short story, he shares with us treasured images of the undiscovered Kashash al Hamam.

One of my enduring memories of living in Damascus will always be the early morning ritual of my neighbor’s pigeon’s swoop and circle above my house. While I sip coffee on my rooftop he would wave and whistle at his birds, even when the war started they continued to fly, they still do. In formation they rarely strayed from their flight path, much like the fighter jets that also became a morning ritual and one I wish would not endure.

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Syrians know the men as Kashash al Hamam, almost every working class neighborhood has one, men of dubious character, so dubious in fact their testimony is not accepted in court, although they’re hardly pushers or pimps. I am sure most Syrians in exile reading this will feel a peck at their heart strings; looking down from Qasyun as the sun is setting and among a thousand minarets are a thousand flocks that swirl and eddy over the city.

Innocuous it may seem but their reputation as fly-by-nights has been earned through guile; kidnapping and extortion are all part of the sport – when a neighbor’s bird is lured by a feathered temptress onto the roof of the pigeon loft, a net is waiting, then begins the harangue and haggle. Mostly it’s a game and all the contestants know the unwritten rules but from time to time blood is spilled.

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Friday souks on the fringes of cities such as Damascus and Aleppo throng with buyers and sellers, hessian sacks fidgeting with avian loot, some of the birds are highly prized and can sell for thousands of dollars, dealers operate from hidden cafes in the less salubrious parts of town.

Morally too there is dispute; Kashash al Hamam are deemed un-Islamic, spending too much time and money on their birds and not enough with their family, and of course the fact that the sport is carried out on rooftops that afford a voyeuristic vantage point, open courtyards where modesty can be disregarded.

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In my time exploring this fascinating world I found less of the darker side, constantly being warned to stay away from the edge of the roof so as not to annoy the neighbors, for the most part the men I met just wanted a distraction from the usual stresses of everyday life, a cigarette and a cup of tea.

Now as Syria is being ripped apart by a brutal war and the Daesh virus spreads unchecked across the country, the self-styled Mullahs of the so called Islamic State have issued a Fatwa outlawing the keeping of pigeons, the reason farcical in the extreme; the sight of the birds genitals as they fly overhead being offensive to Islam. It would be funny if it were not so desperately sad.

The fabric of Syrian society is being torn to shreds, once tolerant and accepting it’s now divided and bleeding, the bearded firebrands are not welcome in Syria, perhaps it’s not the keeping of pigeons that is the problem but that the dove is a symbol of peace.

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All photos are copyrighted to John Wreford

John Wreford
John is a photographer who has lived in Syria for many years. He recently had to leave his house in Damascus’ Old City, and currently resides in Istanbul.
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