Column: Arab Literature
Snapshots of 3 of the 5 books recommended by Arablit
Our literature columnist Marcia Lynx Qualey, who also runs the popular blog Arablit, has listed five must-reads for the cold season. © Your Middle East
Snapshots of 3 of the 5 books recommended by Arablit
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Marcia Lynx Qualey
Last updated: November 30, 2012

5 new book releases to curl up with this winter

Our literature columnist Marcia Lynx Qualey, who also runs the popular blog Arablit, has listed five must-reads for the cold season.

Tree of Pearls, Queen of Egypt
By Jurji Zaidan (trans. Samah Selim), Syracuse University Press

It’s taken more than a hundred years, but Jurji Zaidan’s fast-paced tale of political intrigue is finally available in English. Set in thirteenth century Egypt and Iraq, during the downfall of the Ayyubids and the upsurge of the Mamluks, Tree of Pearls traces the brief reign of Egypt’s first Muslim queen, the “Tree of Pearls.” Sexual politics, intrigue, social climbing, and love are set against a sweeping change of empire. This wonderfully fun book is rendered into beautiful, Sir-Walter-Scott-accented English by Samah Selim.

In Praise of Hatred
By Khaled Khalifa (trans. Leri Price), Transworld

The Girl Who Fell to Earth
By Sophia al-Maria, Harper Perennial

Writer and filmmaker Sophia Al-Maria makes her debut with a memoir about her coming-of-age as it spanned Washington state (USA), Qatar, Riyadh (KSA), Cairo, and beyond. The aim, as Al-Maria says, is to “flip the Arab-woman-memoir genre on its head.”

Days of the Diaspora
By Kamal Ruhayyim (trans. Sarah Enany), American University in Cairo Press

Days of the Diaspora is set amongst the Jewish Egyptian community in Paris. It’s narrated by a young Muslim man whose father has died and who is raised by his Jewish mother, grandparents, aunts, and uncles. The family is exiled from Egypt, and although the narrator is free to return, he has difficulty deciding how to see himself. The book is engaging, sometimes troubling, skillfully translated by Sarah Enany, and tugs the reader into questions of identifier and identity.

The Grub Hunter
By Amir Tag Elsir (trans William Hutchins), Heinemann

This “book about writing a book” begins as a former security agent decides to write a novel. The agent, known as Abdallah Harfash and Abdallah Farfar, was retired from service after his leg was blown off, and hobbles around on a wooden leg. In retirement, he decides that writing a novel couldn’t be that hard, and sets off in pursuit of a narrative. The translation is a bit flat-footed at times, but the dance between security agent, novelist, creative writing, and spying is both engaging on its surface and thought-provoking below.

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